Audrey Shillington

Director and Professor, School of Social Work

School of Social Work, Colorado State University

NLS user since 1995

Citations
  • Shillington, AM, Woodruff, SI, Clapp, JD, Reed, MB, Lemus, H. (2012). Self-Reported Age of Onset and Telescoping for Cigarettes, Alcohol and Marijuana Across Eight Years of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. (2012). Journal Child and Adolescent Substance Abuse. 31 Aug 2012 (Online), 26 Sep 2012 (Print) DOI:10.1080/1067828X.2012.710026.
  • Shillington, AM, Clapp, JD, Reed, MB. (2012). The Stability of Self-Reported Marijuana Use Across Eight Years of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Journal of Child and Adolescent Substance Abuse. Sep 1;21(4):333-348. Epub 2012 Sep 12.PMID: 23284228
  • Shillington, AM, Reed, MB, Clapp, JD. Woodruff, SI. (2011). Testing the Length of Time Theory of Recall Decay: Examining Substance Use Report Stability with Ten Years of National Longitudinal Survey of Youth Data. Substance Use and Misuse. Subst Use Misuse. 2011;46(9):1105-12. doi: 10.3109/10826084.2010.548436. Epub 2011 Mar 15. PMID: 21406007.
  • Shillington, AM, Roesch, SC. Reed, MB, Clapp, JD. Woodruff, SI. (2011). Typologies of Recanting of Lifetime Cigarette, Alcohol and Marijuana Use During a Six-Year Longitudinal Panel Study. Drug and Alcohol Dependence. Nov 1;118(2-3):134-40. ISSN: 1082-6084 print / 1532-2491 online DOI: 10.3109/10826084.2010.548436.
  • Shillington, AM, Clapp, JD, Reed, MB, Woodruff, SI. (2011). Adolescent Alcohol Use Self-Report Stability: A Decade of Panel Study Data. Journal of Child and Adolescent Substance Abuse. 20, 63-81. DOI 10.1080/1067828X.2011.534366
  • Shillington, AM, Reed, MB, Clapp, JD. (2010). Self-Report Stability of Adolescent Cigarette Use Across 10 Years of Panel Study Data. Journal of Child and Adolescent Substance Abuse. 19,2, 171-191. DOI: 1080/10678281003635089.
What I learned from NLS data

With the support of NIAAA funding, we learned that the stability of adolescent substance use self-reports are relatively high. There appears to be key factors that predict which substances are less accurately reported over time as children move through adolescence and young adulthood.

Why I chose NLS data

This is a very rare dataset that affords a researcher to examine panel data across generations. The child data can be linked to parents who have been interviewed for decades. Not only is there panel data on the children, but child outcomes can be matched to parental experiences and behaviors such as economics, fertility, substance use, mental health.